Legal English "Peter's Pills": Legal Doublets | Confprofessioni
FN | 01/04/2021
Legal English "Peter's Pills": Legal Doublets

Sesto appuntamento con il video-corso di inglese giuridico promosso da Federnotizie in collaborazione con Confprofessioni e Beprof

Nuovo appuntamento con "Peter's Pills", la rubrica online di Legal English by Federnotizie (la rivista online di Federnotai), in collaborazione con Confprofessioni e Beprof.

La sesta video-lezione “Legal Doublets” è disponibile sul sito www.federnotizie.it, sui canali social e sul sito di Confprofessioni e sulla app Beprof, scaricabile da App Store e Google Play.

 

LESSON N. 6: CLICCA QUI

 

Transcript:

 

Hello!

 

Modern English words derive from many different languages.

 

English as we know it today consists of approximately 29% of words which originate from Latin, 29% of French words, 26% of Germanic and Anglo-Saxon words, and about 16% of words from other languages.

 

This means that today we have many different synonyms in English of different origins. An example of this could be “freedom” and “liberty” where freedom comes from the German “freiheit” and liberty comes from the French “liberté”. We also have two words like “brotherhood” and “fraternity” which mean exactly the same thing with brotherhood coming form the German “bruderschaft” and fraternity coming from the French “fraternité”.

 

This phenomenon is even more evident in Legal English. In Legal English we have what we call Legal Doublets.

 

Now, a Legal Doublet is a standardized phrase frequently used in Legal English consisting of two or more words that are near synonyms (sinonimi quasi del tutto simili), usually connected by the word “and”. There are two important things for you to know. First of all, Legal Doublets keep the same order, so we say “null and void”. We don’t say “void and null” (come dire: “due e tutti” anziché “tutti e due”), and very often we have a one word equivalent for a Legal Doublet, so “null and void” could become “void”.

 

Very commonly used Legal Doublets that we use today in English are:

 

 

To make our lives even more interesting, we also have what we call Legal Triplets. Commonly used Legal Triplets that we see in English today still include:

 

 

Thank you for joining me and I hope to see you next week for more Peter’s Pills to improve your Legal English.

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See about the history of loan words (parole prese in presito) in English and its impact on the English lexicon here: http://www.jcreview.com/fulltext/197-1577637305.pdf